hegelpd

hegelpd

Classical german philosophy. University of Padova research group

HPD – HOLIDAYS: BOOK REVIEW: A. Gambarotto, “Vital forces, teleology, and organization. Philosophy of nature and the rise of biology in Germany” (Daniele Bertoletti)

hegelpd takes a summer holiday. In this period we publish some posts already appeared on the blog.

 

We are glad to announce that Daniele Bertoletti‘s review of the book Vital Forces, Teleology and Organization. Philosophy of Nature and the Rise of Biology in Germany by A. Gambarotto, appeared in the issue of «Verifiche»,  XLII, N. 1-2, (2018), is now available in Open Access.

You can find the review at this link.

A. Gambarotto, "Vital Forces, Teleology and Organization." (Springer 2017)

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/hpd-holidays-book-review-a-gambarotto-vital-forces-teleology-and-organization-philosophy-of-nature-and-the-rise-of-biology-in-germany-daniele-bertoletti/

HPD – HOLIDAYS: Hegelian Interviews: Rocío Zambrana

hegelpd takes a summer holiday. In this period we publish some posts already appeared on the blog.

 

We are happy to continue with the series Hegelian Interviews, started on the occasion of hegelpd’s fifth birthday and specifically designed for our blog. Professor Rocío Zambrana, whom we sincerely thank, answers some questions about the path of her philosophical education, the topic of philosophy as a form of critique, the influence of Hegel’s thought on her work, the increasingly global dimension of research, and the advent of new technologies.

Rocío Zambrana is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Oregon. She has been appointed 2018 Edith Kreeger Wolf Distinguished Visiting Associate Professor at Northwestern University.

Her work examines conceptions of critique in Hegel, Marx, Frankfurt School Critical Theory, Marxist Feminism, Decolonial Thought and Decolonial Feminism, and Latinx, Latin American, and Caribbean Feminisms.
A large part of her research was dedicated to exploring the potentiality of Hegel’s thought for critique. Her current work concerns coloniality as the afterlife of colonialism, considering the articulation and deployment of race/gender issues as crucial to the development and resilience of capitalism.
Amongst her several publications in renowned academic journals and volumes, we would like to remind her two books: Hegel’s Theory of Intelligibility (University of Chicago Press, 2015), and Colonial Debts: The Case of Puerto Rico (Forthcoming).

 

Your first book Hegel’s Theory of Intelligibility has received great attention and has made you one of the most interesting Hegelian interpreters on the international scene. We would like to start this conversation by asking you about the pathways that led you to this volume: what were the most important steps and how did your interest in Hegel begin?

I came to philosophy quite late during my undergraduate studies at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, which is also my hometown. I was initially a psychology major, but through a friend of a friend took a course in ethics with Anayra Santory-Jorge. We read Arendt and Foucault and studied cases of institutional violence in Latin America. This was the most significant experience of my intellectual trajectory. Santory-Jorge did not introduce me to a philosophical “canon,” which reproduces a linear view of the history of philosophical texts and problems. Such development is implicitly or explicitly geographically and demographically indexed. Rather, Santory-Jorge’s class introduced me to the power and value of philosophy to generate concepts that problematize the present. I read Hegel only once at the UPR – within a course on modern and contemporary philosophy. Ironically, I recall referring to his texts as “unintelligible”. At the UPR, I undertook two projects that at the time I understood as fundamentally disconnected from Hegel’s thought: a BA thesis on Foucault’s views on power seeking to elucidate the transition from Spanish to US colonial rule. The thesis intervened in debates about the political instability of nationalist discourses in Puerto Rico at the turn of the century. I was also part of an interdisciplinary group that produced a comparative study of gender disparity in children of El Salvador and Puerto Rico from a Foucaultian perspective.
I read Hegel seriously and found his thought generative at the New School for Social Research. Initially, I went to the NSSR to continue to work on power and colonialism as a MA student. I enrolled in Jay Bernstein’s year-long lecture course on Hegel’s Phenomenology and my view of Hegel changed fundamentally. Bernstein’s reading of the text – his emphasis on action and his reading of Hegel’s reading of Antigone – were decisive. Hegelian negativity became an indispensable resource for thinking questions of critique and normativity implicit in my work on Foucault and Puerto Rico. I wrote a MA thesis on Hegel’s notion of Anerkennung in which I began to explore what I came to call “normative ambivalence” in my PhD thesis years later. Late in my PhD studies, I became convinced that everything I found compelling in Hegel’s early work and in the Phenomenology required an understanding of Hegelian Negativität as a logical category. Angelica Nuzzo’s essays on dialectics, Karin DeBoer’s work on Hegel and Derrida, and Gillian Rose’s Hegel Contra Sociology became indispensable. Rather than writing a PhD thesis on the Phenomenology, I wrote on key moments in the Logic, arguing that the discussion of negativity interrupts assumptions about normativity helpful for calling into question core aspects of Habermasian and post-Habermasian conceptions of critique. The thesis sought to develop conceptual tools for specifying the work of critique via Hegel in light of “normative ambivalence,” where the instability of critical language is heightened by and folded into the logic of neoliberal capitalism.
Hegel’s Theory of Intelligibility elaborates key strands of the work on the Logic that I had merely begun in the PhD thesis. In many ways, it also continues to explore themes from my work at the University of Puerto Rico as well. The notions of normative precariousness and normative ambivalence developed in the book assess the limits and possibilities of critique in light of the instability of critical thought and practice. The book, however, left behind an explicit consideration of the consequences that follow for notions of critique in Critical Theory as well as Post- and Decolonial thought and practice. I developed the latter in essays and book chapters.

 

One of the central aspects of your philosophical proposal concerns the conception of philosophy as a form of critique, which conceives the present, on the one hand, as the result of the affirmation of specific historical dynamics, and, on the other, as just a partial and “ambivalent” realization of their underlying instances. This makes it possible to identify “spaces of resistance” for the building of a better future. Why do you think that Hegel’s thought more than others would allow us to acquire such a critical perspective with respect to the present?

How we name phenomena matters. Philosophy has the power to generate and assess concepts that name phenomena here and now. In that sense, it is fundamentally a critical practice. It can name phenomena, however, in better or worse ways. It can, in fact, elucidate just as much as obfuscate reality. For this reason, philosophy is necessarily a pluralist practice and must understand itself as subject to the same fate as the phenomena it names. When philosophy fails to consider marginalized voices, for example, or to understand the instability of critical language it neutralizes its transformative potential as well as its relevance.
This view of philosophy is at odds with Hegelian actualization as it is understood in conventional readings of Hegel. Critique does not “affirm” historical dynamics, nor is the ambivalence of actualization a matter of “partiality of underlying instances.” These characterizations are closer to readings of Hegel that tend to stress the revisionist or ameliorist aspects of his texts. The aspects of Hegelian actualization that I believe are worth recovering have to do with externalization. The easiest way to understand the stakes here is to think of action. As Robert Pippin has argued, Hegel understands action as the inseparability of an intention and the performed deed. To act is to attempt to express an intention publically. But this means that the determinacy of an action is not fully up to the agent. It is a matter of its externality – its “publicity,” for instance. Action is a form of self-negation, then. The determinacy of deeds, moral worth, even intentions can only be established in light of the temporal extension and intersubjective character of action, hence in light of misfires, competing interpretations, unforeseen consequences, incongruent normative expectations, and so on, that exceed the intentions of the agent. An action as well as an intention is thus the result of a process of actualization that necessarily exceeds it. Along these lines, spaces of resistance, as well as philosophy as a critical practice, are always subject to normative instability, co-option, to coextensive positive and negative meanings and effects. This is what I call “ambivalence.” This means that any material or discursive gain against systems of oppression is fragile, “precarious,” in need of being maintained, even radically transformed in light of new material and historical conditions.
Hegelian negativity has allowed me to develop conceptual resources for thinking the ways in which ambivalence constrains – both restricts and makes possible – critical praxis. Rather than contradiction, which is irrevocably tied to linearity and a discourse of progress, negativity has provided me with ways of speaking of the promise and perils of critical praxis here and now. However, Hegel’s thought is not better than others for developing these resources. I sometime characterize my relationship to Hegel’s thought as a form of “appropriation” (in “Boundary, Ambivalence, Jaibería, or, How to Appropriate Hegel”). I am aware that this might seem problematic, but I aim to resist the view that there is something inherent in Hegel’s thought ready to be “applied.” Whether implicitly or explicitly, applications resist contamination. They resist a dialectical understanding of concept and case, whereby each fundamentally modifies the other in their encounter. This is, of course, a Hegelian lesson, and perhaps what makes Hegel’s thought available for critical praxis. Yet, what I call ambivalence and precariousness is perhaps better thought via Marx and some Marxisms, Feminisms, and Decolonial thought and praxis with their emphases on material conditions, the intersection of multiple systems of oppression, and liminality.

 

The field to which you have applied your conception of philosophy as a critique most extensively is that of decolonial thought, which combines the analysis of the experience of a colonial past with the examination of race, gender and class hierarchies. Why do you think Hegel’s philosophy is so effective in this context?

My work on critique has, more and more, explicitly centered on the notion of “coloniality.” I have explored coloniality as the afterlife of colonialism, considering the articulation and deployment of race/gender as crucial to the development and resilience of capitalism. Increasingly so, I have explored the ambivalence of critical thought and practice in neoliberal and colonial contexts. I have sought to track the coextensive positive and negative meaning and effects of critique at the intersection of capitalism, colonialism, and cisheteropatriarchy. As I mentioned above, I do not see this as a work of “application.” There is an undeniable relation between my thinking of Hegelian negativity and my views on a critique of coloniality and decolonial praxis – specifically around the normative instability of praxis. Yet, I would want to resist characterizing my work on the latter as distinctively “Hegelian.” There are many aspects of Hegel’s thought that undermine the project and aims of decoloniality. There is an undeniable Eurocentrism, to name just one problem, in Hegel’s thought that cannot be reconciled with the intersection of decoloniality, critiques of political economy, and feminist critiques of cisheteropatriarchy that my current work explores.

 

Your interpretation of Hegel emphasizes the role of negativity in the determination of reality as Wirklichkeit, the dialectical – and therefore necessarily precarious and ambivalent – nature of any form of determination. You have highlighted the emancipatory potential of these aspects of Hegelian philosophy by making them interact with the decolonial debate. However, these aspects are elaborated in the Phenomenology of the Spirit and above all in the Science of Logic, while it is evident that other parts of Hegel’s philosophy, paradoxically those in which Hegel has considered the present more closely, move from definitely Eurocentric and colonialist assumptions. How should one deal with these parts of the Hegelian thought today? Is it necessary to accept a rigid distinction between parts that can be made contemporary and those that cannot, or is there in any case a line of continuity between the emancipatory elements of Hegelian thought and the other parts, which allows us to save at least some aspects of it? If yes, which ones?

I engage this crucial question in my “Hegel, History, and Race.” The relation between the form and content of Hegel’s text is key. One cannot assess the power of Hegelian concepts without considering their relation to the disturbing content – concerning race and gender – found throughout his corpus. Form and content are distinguishable but not separable, in my view. Thus, I don’t think that deflationary or revisionist readings of Hegel should ignore deeply disturbing passages. I agree with Robert Bernasconi that academic philosophy is disproportionately white and male partly because research and teaching practices tend to downplay the racism and sexism of canonical figures and texts. Calling attention to these passages and exploring if and how they are part of the logic of the positions distinctive of a text or corpus is necessary to the critical reception of any text.
I do not do this enough in Hegel’s Theory of Intelligibility, but I have in “Hegel, History, and Race” and in a recent text that has not yet appeared in print, “‘Bad Habits:’ Idleness, Critique, Interruption in Hegel.” In “Hegel, History, and Race,” for example, I track the connection between Hegel’s Anthropology and Philosophy of History in order to map the continuity of a racial hierarchy in both. In “Bad Habits,” I track assumptions about productivity in the context of Hegel’s view of habituation in order to problematize recent work on embodied normativity in Hegel. Hegel’s assumptions are also connected to his deeply disturbing views on race. Drawing attention to these aspects is key to considering the implications of contemporary readings of Hegel, especially when we seek to specify not only the limits but the promises of his texts.

 

In recent decades, the horizons of every person have widened to take on an undoubtedly global dimension. What has such a change of perspective meant/what does it mean in your experience as a scholar?

I take it that the reference here is the advance of neoliberal capitalism, and one would need to include its mutations in light of the 2008 financial crisis. Since its inception, capitalism has been a global phenomenon. Its development depended on expropriation and exploitation across the globe. We have various bodies of critical thought and practice that have elucidated such development – from Post- and Decolonial thought, to Critical Black Studies, Marxism, and Feminisms. If contemporary neoliberalism has “widened horizons” in recent decades, I would argue that its failures – indeed its forms of violence from extreme economic inequality, environmental degradation, deepened race and gender hierarchies – have generated critical perspectives that seek to “decolonize” thought and practice. If there is any “widened horizon,” then, I would argue that it only counts as “widened” insofar as it is based on an awareness of the continuation and intensification of coloniality. An example of such a widened perspective would be an international new wave of feminisms that draw links between femicide and economic degradation, racisms and sexism, ecological catastrophe, and so on, thereby calling into question the meaning and effects of the neoliberal project. The failure of such a project, however, has also fueled the rise of xenophobia, racism, nationalism, and other far right phenomena, eroding political gains for marginalized and oppressed populations. This context is crucial to my thinking, writing, and my responsibilities within and beyond the academe. In a time when feminist, anti-racist, and anti-capitalist gains are fragile, it matters a great deal what and how we write, teach, and participate.

 

We are facing a real technological revolution that permeates all aspects of our lives. How do you assess this change in the field of academic studies? Has the introduction of new information technology had a significant impact on the way you practice research and define teaching?

Connectivity has allowed me to reach texts and discussions that would have otherwise been difficult to access from afar. Despite the ways in which it has been utilized to undermine key political gains, and despite its shortcomings when it comes to being materially accessible to all, I believe it retains critical potential. I won’t say much more about this because I believe we are still trying to understand the phenomena and there are people thinking and writing on the topic that have far more informed things to say.

 

Finally, we would like to ask you to list at least five books or contributions on classical German philosophy that have been crucial to your education.

Specifically on Classical German Philosophy and indispensable for my work on Hegel:

  • Gillian Rose, Hegel Contra Sociology
  • Angelica Nuzzo, Memory, History, Justice in Hegel (initially, her essays “Dialectic as a Logic of Transformative Processes” and “The End of Hegel’s Logic”)
  • Rebecca Comay, Mourning Sickness (initially, her essay “Dead Right”)
  • Karin DeBoer, On Hegel: The Sway of the Negative (initially her essays, “Différance as Negativity” and “Tragedy, Dialectics, and Différance: On Hegel and Derrida”)
  • Robert Pippin, Hegel’s Idealism and Hegel’s Practical Philosophy

[Interview by Giovanna Miolli and Elena Tripaldi].

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/hpd-holidays-hegelian-interviews-rocio-zambrana/

HPD – Holidays: Material: Ludwig Siep, “Formen des Widerstandsrechts bei Kant, Fichte, Hegel und den Frühkonstitutionalisten”

hegelpd takes a summer holiday. In this period we publish some posts already appeared on the blog.

 

25 April is the Anniversary that commemorates Italy’s Liberation, accomplished by the partisan forces, which put an end to the Fascist regime and the Nazi occupation. On this special occasion, we are extremely pleased to share an essay by Ludwig Siep that has been specifically composed for hegelpd. The essay is entitled “Formen des Widerstandsrechts bei Kant, Fichte, Hegel und den Frühkonstitutionalisten” and is based on Siep’s paper “Widerstandsrecht zwischen Vernunftstaat und Rechtsstaat”, published in the latest volume Ein Recht auf Widerstand gegen den Staat? Verteidigung und Kritik des Widerstandsrechts seit der europäischen Aufklärung, edited by David P. Schweikard, Nadine Mooren and Ludwig Siep (Mohr Siebeck 2018), 99-131.

 

In this essay, Siep explores the notion of “Widerstandsrecht” (the right to resist) within the German philosophy of the 18th and 19th centuries. This right becomes crucial whenever a State no longer fulfils its duty to ensure its citizens’ fundamental rights: in these circumstances, after having run out of all legal means, citizens have the right to resist. Siep starts its analysis by observing the considerable relevance that such a right has in the contemporary philosophical, political and legal debate concerning both single constitutions and international law. He then shows in detail how a negative attitude towards this notion has prevailed for a long time in German culture. Indeed, both Kant and Hegel do not adequately set out the limits of the sovereignty of the State with respect to citizens’ rights. This is certainly due to the ambivalent echo of the French Revolution: on one hand, the idea of establishing the State authority on a reasonable constitution, in which citizens can identify themselves, is welcomed by Kant and his successors; on the other hand though, the violent overthrow of the legitimate order is set as the root of the derailment in the Terror. According to Siep, to better understand the right to resist, it is therefore necessary to turn to less known philosophers and jurists, such as Carl von Rotteck, Carl-Theodor Welcker and Robert von Mohl, often called “Frühkonstitutionalisten” (early constitutionalists). They give rise to a German tradition of the rule of law, which constitutionally limits the citizen’s obligation to obey: this duty ceases to be valid in the circumstances in which the authorities massively violate the constitution and the fundamental rights. These theorists thus also legitimise active forms of resistance.

The essay first investigates various attempts to attribute to Kant and Hegel a constitutional Widerstandsrecht, since they both belong to the tradition of Hobbes’ criticism to the right to resist and of the primacy of State sovereignty (I). Secondly, the text explores Locke’s tradition of the right to resist, as developed by the “early constitutionalists” (II). In the last part of the essay, which meaning could this right have for the method of political philosophy is then discussed, with particular reference to the concepts of “reason” and “system” (III).

 

Ludwig Siep is Professor Emeritus at the University of Münster and Seniorprofessor at the Exzellenzcluster “Religion und Politik” at the same university. His books include Hegels Fichtekritik und die Wissenschaftslehre von 1804 (1970), Anerkennung als Prinzip der praktischen Philosophie (2nd edn, 2014), Praktische Philosophie im Deutschen Idealismus (1992), Der Weg der Phänomenologie des Geistes (2000), Konkrete Ethik. Grundlagen der Natur- und Kulturethik (2004), Aktualität und Grenzen der praktischen Philosophie Hegels (2010) and Der Staat als irdischer Gott. Genesis und Relevanz einer Hegelschen Idee (2015). He is also the editor of G.W.F. Hegel: Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts (3rd edn, 2014).

Hegelpd sincerely thanks Professor Siep for his courtesy and his friendship with our research group.

The essay is available by clicking on the button below.

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/hpd-holidays-material-ludwig-siep-formen-des-widerstandsrechts-bei-kant-fichte-hegel-und-den-fruhkonstitutionalisten/

HPD – Holidays: Book Review on NDPR: L. CORTI, A.M. NUNZIANTE (EDS.), “SELLARS AND THE HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY” (Johannes Haag)

hegelpd takes a summer holiday. In this period we publish some posts already appeared on the blog.

 

We are happy to give notice of Johannes Haag‘s review of Sellars and the History of Modern Philosophy, edited by L. Corti and A.M Nunziante (Routledge, 2018).

The review of the book is available at this link.

L.Corti, A. Nunziante (ed. by), "Sellars and the History of Modern Philosophy" (Routledge, 2018)

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/hpd-holidays-book-review-on-ndpr-l-corti-a-m-nunziante-eds-sellars-and-the-history-of-modern-philosophy-johannes-haag/

HPD – Holidays: Hegelian Interviews: Francesca Menegoni

hegelpd takes a summer holiday. In this period we publish some posts already appeared on the blog.

 

In occasione del quinto compleanno di hegelpd (3 novembre 2018), siamo stati felici di proporre un’intervista concepita appositamente per il nostro blog. A rispondere ad alcune domande riguardanti la sua formazione di studiosa e lo stato degli studi della filosofia classica tedesca, la dimensione sempre più marcatamente globale della ricerca, la questione di genere e l’avvento delle nuove tecnologie, è stata la professoressa Francesca Menegoni, che ringraziamo di cuore.

Francesca Menegoni è professoressa ordinaria di filosofia morale presso il Dipartimento di Filosofia, Sociologia, Pedagogia e Psicologia Applicata dell’Università degli Studi di Padova. I suoi interessi scientifici si rivolgono prevalentemente all’etica e alla filosofia dell’azione, alla filosofia della religione, alla filosofia classica tedesca (con particolare attenzione al pensiero di Kant e di Hegel). È membro di numerosi Consigli direttivi di riviste e centri di ricerca a livello nazionale e internazionale e, dal 2001 al 2017, ha fatto parte del Consiglio di Presidenza della Internationale Hegel-Vereinigung. Tra i suoi numerosi volumi e contributi, ricordiamo Moralità e morale in Hegel (Padova 1982), Finalità e destinazione morale nella “Critica del Giudizio” di Kant (Trento 1988), Soggetto e struttura dell’agire in Hegel (Trento 1993), Le ragioni della speranza (Padova 2001), Fede e religione in Kant (1775-1798) (Trento 2005), La “Critica del Giudizio” di Kant. Introduzione alla lettura (Roma 2008) e Hegel (Brescia 2018).

Hanno collaborato alla realizzazione dell’intervista Giulia Bernard, Armando Manchisi, Francesco Campana, Giovanna Miolli, Luca Corti.

 

***

Il suo recente volume Hegel (Brescia 2018) costituisce l’approdo di un lungo itinerario di ricerca che ha visto al centro il filosofo tedesco. Vorremmo aprire questa conversazione chiedendole di raccontarci gli inizi di questo percorso e quali sono state le tappe più importanti.

Nel breve Profilo di Hegel, pubblicato da Morcelliana, ho cercato di fornire al lettore un filo conduttore per collegare le diverse fasi della produzione hegeliana, invitandolo a confrontarsi in prima persona con quei testi o con quei luoghi che più attirano la sua curiosità o che meglio rispondono ai suoi interessi. Nel dare questa impostazione a un volumetto, che è stato pensato non tanto come approdo di un percorso di ricerca, quanto come uno strumento limitato per sua natura, dati i rigorosi limiti di pagine fissati dagli Editori della Collana, ha sicuramente agito il ricordo del mio primo incontro con i testi hegeliani durante gli studi universitari tra la fine degli anni Sessanta e gli inizi degli anni Settanta. Durante gli studi liceali poco spazio veniva dato alla lettura diretta delle opere degli autori studiati. Nelle aule universitarie si respirava invece un’aria diversa grazie ad alcuni docenti che ci introducevano alla lettura dei classici, antichi e moderni, supportando le linee teoriche presentate nelle lezioni con seminari di discussione e gruppi di lettura. Ho avuto la fortuna di essere introdotta al lavoro diretto sui testi hegeliani fin dal mio primo anno durante il Corso di Filosofia della religione tenuto nel 1969/70 da Franco Chiereghin, un giovane docente che con pazienza e arguzia ci guidava alla comprensione del lessico hegeliano, apparentemente impenetrabile, aiutandoci a cogliere le sue infinite potenzialità. Da quelle lezioni è scaturita la decisione di approfondire lo studio della filosofia hegeliana con la tesi di laurea sul ruolo della religione negli scritti jenesi e con la tesi di perfezionamento (allora il dottorato di ricerca non esisteva) dedicata alla morale hegeliana. Direttore severo di entrambe le tesi (1974, 1976), ma sempre prodigo di consigli, fu Franco Chiereghin. Gli sviluppi di questi primi studi furono esposti in due volumi: Morale e moralità in Hegel (1982) e Soggetto e struttura dell’agire in Hegel (1993). Queste pubblicazioni mi consentirono di accedere a un ambito di ricerche sulla filosofia hegeliana allora agli albori: la moralità, infatti, posta nella Filosofia del diritto tra diritto ed eticità, costituiva all’epoca uno degli aspetti più negletti del sistema hegeliano. L’interesse per la filosofia pratica era prevalentemente orientato verso le strutture della Sittlichkeit e alla dialettica tra società civile e Stato. Ben pochi erano coloro che coglievano nell’esposizione dei concetti portanti della Moralität (il proposito, l’intenzione, la responsabilità, la coscienza morale) linee teoriche che anticipavano i dibattiti dei nostri giorni sull’etica e sulla sua normatività, così come pochi leggevano l’intera filosofia pratica hegeliana come prassi, ossia come esposizione di attività differenziate, un’esposizione che anticipava le direttrici più significative della teoria dell’azione. Per queste ragioni ho concluso il breve Profilo dedicato a Hegel ricordando la sua lezione etica e politica, una lezione che, contemperando le ragioni dell’intero con quelle del singolo, mi sembra conservare intatta la sua attualità.

 

Negli ultimi decenni, la ricerca in ambito di filosofia classica tedesca ha registrato importanti mutamenti di interesse, aprendosi a sensibilità teoriche molto diverse fra loro. In che modo il confronto con nuovi orizzonti interpretativi ha modificato l’ambito della filosofia pratica? E, più nello specifico, in che misura questo ha influito sulla trattazione del tema che forse più di tutti ha caratterizzato la sua ricerca, ovvero quello dell’azione in autori come Kant e Hegel?

Non c’è dubbio che negli ultimi cinquant’anni la ricerca sulla filosofia classica tedesca ha registrato significativi mutamenti di interesse, grazie all’interazione tra sensibilità teoriche molto diverse fra loro. Nel mio personale percorso di ricerca ho avuto modo di vivere alcuni di questi mutamenti grazie al confronto con alcuni importanti studiosi, che furono protagonisti di alcuni di questi mutamenti. Cercherò quindi di rispondere a questa domanda menzionandone a titolo esemplificativo alcuni.
Vorrei cominciare innanzitutto ricordando la figura di Manfred Riedel, a cui mi rivolsi all’inizio della ricerca sull’azione, dopo aver letto i suoi volumi: Theorie und Praxis im Denken Hegels (1965) e Studien zu Hegels Rechtsphilosophie (1969). In occasione di ripetuti periodi di ricerca presso l’Università di Erlangen, dove Riedel insegnava prima di concludere la sua carriera a Halle, ebbi modo di scoprire con mia sorpresa, frequentando le sue lezioni e i suoi seminari, che nel frattempo si era lasciato alle spalle il cammino che lo aveva portato da Leipzig a Heidelberg, e lì, grazie a Gadamer e Löwith, da Marx a Hegel a Heidegger, perché la teoria della soggettività che aveva delineato in Theorie und Praxis e che era la risposta alla situazione politica e culturale della Germania negli anni Sessanta, non era più idonea a interpretare la mutata situazione del mondo tedesco. Per affrontare i nuovi problemi erano necessari nuovi apparati concettuali, che avevano portato Riedel alla fine degli anni Ottanta a guardare con interesse crescente alla Urteilskraft kantiana e al suo rapporto con la ragione teoretica e pratica per proporre il primato di una filosofia seconda. In questo modo l’ambito pratico tornava ad essere protagonista alla vigilia della riunificazione tedesca, ma in un’ottica completamente diversa rispetto agli anni Sessanta.
Sul primato della filosofia pratica si interrogavano in quegli anni anche altri studiosi con approcci diversi. Per restare sempre all’interno della cerchia di personalità filosofiche che hanno inciso sul mio modo di fare ricerca e che hanno inaugurato nuovi orizzonti interpretativi nell’ambito della filosofia pratica, penso ad Adriaan Peperzak, a Claudio Cesa, a Ludwig Siep. Di Peperzak, allievo di Paul Ricoeur, mi aveva colpito Le jeune Hegel et la vision morale du monde (1960), che rompeva con una lettura stereotipata degli scritti giovanili, e mi affascinava la sua capacità di leggere Hegel dall’interno. Ricordo alcuni suoi seminari organizzati a Napoli dall’Istituto per gli Studi filosofici. Quelle lezioni magistrali si tradussero poi nella pubblicazione di alcuni commentari puntuali alla filosofia dello spirito hegeliana. Di Claudio Cesa ricordo un intervento memorabile a Stoccarda allo Hegel-Kongress del 1981, in cui sostenne che la filosofia morale è l’ambito in cui più profonde sono le differenze tra Fichte, Schelling e Hegel, pur essendo tutti accomunati dall’esigenza di superare il formalismo dell’etica kantiana. Analogo peso ebbero per me gli studi di Ludwig Siep sul tema del riconoscimento come principio della filosofia pratica. Inutile dire quanto questo tema continui a essere presente nel dibattito attuale, in un’ottica profondamente mutata, anche grazie alla sua rivisitazione da parte di Axel Honneth. Altrettanto importante fu il confronto con gli allievi di Siep e, in particolare, con Michael Quante, che aveva pubblicato nel medesimo anno in cui usciva il mio saggio sull’agire in Hegel, un volume intitolato Hegels Begriff der Handlung. La sua lettura metteva a confronto le analisi hegeliane dell’azione descritte all’interno della sezione Moralität con alcune interpretazioni di area analitica, inaugurando quel dialogo tra tradizione analitica e tradizione continentale che ha avuto negli ultimi vent’anni un grande successo.

 

Passando agli ambiti della sua ricerca, ci piacerebbe ascoltare il suo parere in merito a una questione all’apparenza meramente formale, che ha però anche implicazioni di contenuto. Nell’università italiana, a differenza che altrove, la disciplina “filosofia della religione” non costituisce un settore scientifico-disciplinare specifico e viene inserita perlopiù nel settore di “filosofia morale”. Quali sono le ragioni di questa classificazione e come la valuta?   

Per rispondere a questa domanda, è forse opportuno premettere che i settori scientifico-disciplinari filosofici (Filosofia teoretica, Filosofia Morale, Logica e Filosofia della scienza, Estetica, Filosofia e teoria dei linguaggi, Storia della filosofia, Storia della filosofia antica, Storia della filosofia medievale) sono una peculiarità tutta italiana e disciplinano la collocazione di ciascun docente nel sistema universitario. I settori scientifico-disciplinari indicano ambiti di ricerca e comprendono diversi insegnamenti sulla base delle declaratorie specifiche di ogni settore. Se si guarda a quanto presente nell’offerta didattica delle Università italiane, si vede che l’insegnamento di Filosofia della religione è affidato a docenti afferenti ai due settori di Filosofia teoretica e di Filosofia morale. Mi sembra che ci siano buone ragioni per comprendere questo insegnamento sotto entrambi i settori. Per quanto mi riguarda, tengo da parecchi anni il corso di Filosofia della religione a Padova, dopo averlo tenuto per titolarità di cattedra a Genova dal 1992 al 1995, nel solco della tradizione del magistero di Franco Chiereghin. Questo per me significa tenere vivo nei corsi un costante riferimento ai classici antichi e moderni: da Platone e Aristotele, a Spinoza, Kant e Hegel.

 

Concentrandoci ora sull’ambito specifico della filosofia della religione: cosa comporta fare ricerca in un campo che, almeno apparentemente, condivide molti temi con altre discipline? In che cosa si distingue la prospettiva di un filosofo della religione da quella, per esempio, di un teologo, quando ci si interroga su temi quali Dio, la religione, la fede? In che modo questa differenza ritorna nella lettura di autori come Kant e Hegel?

Fare ricerca nell’ambito della filosofia della religione, ma soprattutto insegnare questa disciplina comporta una sfida impegnativa, che avverto soprattutto quando entro in aula, perché in questo campo è più difficile che in altri separare gli aspetti tecnici, relativi a contenuti e metodi, dagli aspetti che coinvolgono la cultura, la sensibilità e le convinzioni personali. Anche se la filosofia della religione condivide apparentemente i suoi temi con altre forme di sapere (non solo la teologia, ma anche la storia delle religioni, la sociologia della religione, la fenomenologia della religione, ecc.), ha per sua fortuna una sua autonomia e richiede specifiche competenze in ambito filosofico. Spesso nelle mie lezioni propongo la lettura delle opere di Kant e di Hegel, perché meglio e più di altri hanno saputo esplicitare la specificità della riflessione filosofica sulla religione.
Pochi filosofi hanno indagato come Kant la distinzione tra l’ambito della scienza e il campo della fede. Il suo programma critico-trascendentale esamina le diverse modalità del credere, con la distinzione tra fede razionale e fede religiosa, spingendosi fino all’analisi del rapporto tra teologia rivelata e teologia razionale con il confronto critico con la storia plurisecolare delle prove dell’esistenza di Dio. Negli scritti degli anni ’90 si è occupato delle questioni che concernono le religioni storicamente determinate, a cominciare dal cristianesimo e dai suoi contenuti dottrinari, interrogandosi sulla funzione delle comunità religiose e sulle forme degli atti del culto. Molte analisi che sostanziano il dibattito sulle ‘cose di religione’ della prima metà dell’Ottocento si innestano nel solco delle riflessioni kantiane. Grande in particolare è il debito di Hegel nei suoi confronti. Proprio il fatto di essersi misurato con la radicalità della riflessione kantiana è l’elemento che consente a Hegel di compiere il passo oltre la linea di confine tracciata da Kant con la rivendicazione della necessità per la religione di conoscere il suo oggetto più proprio, Dio. Questa conoscenza non diventa tuttavia una materia posseduta, ma si dispiega nella riflessione sul modo del conoscere, diventando una questione di metodo.

 

Negli ultimi decenni gli orizzonti di ognuno di noi si sono allargati fino ad assumere una dimensione senza dubbio globale. Cosa ha significato e significa, nella sua esperienza di studiosa, un tale cambio di prospettiva?

È vero che la globalizzazione permea e condiziona i nostri orizzonti. Studi diversi ne hanno messo in evidenza gli effetti negativi e quelli positivi nell’economia e nello sviluppo scientifico e, soprattutto, tecnologico. Non mi è ancora chiaro fino a che punto questo fenomeno abbia inciso sulla cultura filosofica. Certo è che l’allargamento degli orizzonti pone alla riflessione filosofica nuovi interrogativi, che riguardano i nuovi modelli economici e di welfare. Sono temi che è doveroso affrontare, per vivere in modo responsabile i mutamenti e le sfide del nostro tempo. Finora ho avuto la possibilità di compiere solo qualche assaggio in quest’ambito di ricerca, come responsabile di un piccolo progetto, che ha fruito della sinergia tra filosofi della morale e psicologi del lavoro attivi all’interno del Dipartimento di Filosofia, Sociologia, Pedagogia e Psicologia Applicata dell’Università di Padova. Alcuni risultati di questa ricerca sono stati raccolti in due volumi recenti (Etica e mondo del lavoro, 2016 e 2017) e hanno fatto emergere agli occhi di chi vi ha partecipato una pluralità imprevista di prospettive e interazioni, che meritano di essere approfondite, ma che possono essere indagate solo con l’apporto complementare di competenze e metodologie diverse

 

Stiamo vivendo una vera e propria rivoluzione tecnologica che permea tutti gli ambiti della nostra vita. Come giudica questo cambiamento nel campo degli studi accademici? L’avvento di nuovi mezzi informatici ha avuto un impatto rilevante nel suo modo di praticare la ricerca e di definire la didattica?

La rivoluzione tecnologica, iniziata qualche decennio fa, sembra accelerare sempre più rapidamente e, per certi aspetti, convulsamente. Appartengo alla generazione di chi ha scritto la tesi di laurea con la mitica Lettera 32, tra fogli di carta carbone e correttore. L’uso del computer ha rappresentato una vera rivoluzione del modo e dei tempi della mia scrittura. Altrettanto significativo è stato il cambiamento intervenuto grazie alla possibilità di consultare testi on line senza spostarsi dalla propria scrivania e la possibilità di comunicare con colleghi di tutto il mondo e studenti via e-mail. Non ho alcun rimpianto per la mitica Olivetti; custodisco però come documenti preziosi le lettere ricevute da chi ha svolto un ruolo importante nella mia formazione e provo un po’ di nostalgia per le ore passate nelle biblioteche di mezza Europa a lasciarmi guidare dai libri, quando bastava che l’occhio cadesse per caso sul volume accanto a quello che cercavo, perché si aprisse una pista di ricerca nuova. A fronte dell’uso disinvolto e a volte esclusivo che gli studenti tendono a fare delle pubblicazioni disponibili in rete, temo le conseguenze della perdita della consuetudine con la pagina stampata e della capacità di soffermarsi sulle singole parole, sui rimandi interni, sul confronto meditato con la pagina scritta

 

Un’altra variazione notevole che merita di essere sottolineata è la presenza sempre più rilevante delle studiose che si occupano di filosofia e, in particolare, di filosofia classica tedesca. Significativo a questo proposito è stato il World WoMen Hegelian Congress, tenutosi con grande successo a Roma lo scorso settembre. Come valuta questa tendenza?

Non mi sembra corretto parlare di presenza sempre più rilevante delle studiose che si occupano di filosofia classica tedesca, perché queste studiose sono sempre esistite, anche se forse sono meno visibili dei loro colleghi. Proprio il World WoMen Hegelian Congress (Roma, 26-28 settembre 2018) ne è una significativa testimonianza. Tra i nomi delle relatrici ho letto quelli di Myriam Bienenstock, Rossella Bonito Oliva, Irene Kajon, Herta Nagl-Docekal, Angelica Nuzzo, Erzsébet Rózsa, Birgit Sandkaulen. Sono studiose ben note e molto stimate nel panorama internazionale. Va pertanto riconosciuto il merito alle organizzatrici dell’evento (Stefania Achella, Gabriella Baptist, Serena Feloj, Francesca Iannelli, Fiorinda Li Vigni, Claudia Melica) di aver messo insieme un cast internazionale davvero notevole. Il problema della presenza di studiose che si occupano di filosofia classica tedesca non è quindi di qualificazione scientifica, ma solo ed esclusivamente di visibilità, a partire dagli organismi direttivi delle maggiori società filosofiche internazionali, in cui la presenza maschile è stata ed è tuttora di gran lunga prevalente. Qualcosa, tuttavia, sta cambiando, anche se molto lentamente. Per questo mi sembra un segnale positivo, che va nella direzione del riconoscimento di un lavoro pluridecennale rigoroso, vedere che la presidenza del Forschungszentrum für Klassische Deutsche Philosophie è affidata a Birgit Sandkaulen e ho salutato con viva gioia la nomina di Dina Emundts alla presidenza della Internationale Hegel Vereinigung.

 

La penultima domanda riguarda il problema dell’attualità (e dell’inattualità) di Hegel, che – da Croce fino a noi – ha costituito quasi una sorta di luogo comune negli studi hegeliani. Ha in mente uno o più aspetti della filosofia hegeliana che, a suo parere, meriterebbero di essere approfonditi, di contro a un tema o a una prospettiva che invece ritiene difficile attualizzare?

Il problema dell’attualità o inattualità della filosofia hegeliana sembra seguire la regola dei corsi e ricorsi di vichiana memoria. Negli ultimi trent’anni sono stati particolarmente studiati i temi della filosofia pratica hegeliana. L’attuale sinergia tra prospettive filosofiche e linee interpretative diverse fa pensare e sperare che questo interesse sia ben lontano dall’essersi esaurito, perché si interroga sulle radici del nostro essere e del nostro operare. Per le medesime ragioni, per ricordare aspetti attuali, si è guardato e si continua a guardare alle strutture dello spirito soggettivo, perché qui, nel nesso tra teoretico e pratico, si apre lo spazio della libertà umana. Questi ambiti, che vanno ben oltre lo spazio della filosofia dello spirito, offrono ancora interessanti possibilità di approfondimento proprio per l’attualità dei temi discussi. Ci sono tuttavia, soprattutto in ambito internazionale, segnali che fanno pensare a uno spostamento di interesse dai temi dello spirito oggettivo a quelli dello spirito assoluto che, con la nota triade arte-religione-filosofia, sembrano essere il retaggio, oggi improponibile, di un modo di fare filosofia appartenente al passato. Sotto questo riguardo trovo estremamente utile e coraggiosa l’iniziativa di due giovani studiosi, Thomas Oehl e Arthur Kok, curatori di un recente volume intitolato Objektiver und absoluter Geist nach Hegel. Kunst, Religion und Philosophie innerhalb und außerhalb von Gesellschaft und Geschichte (2018). Sulla scorta di questa pubblicazione e di alcuni convegni recenti, ritengo che sia tempo che l’intera filosofia dello spirito assoluto meriti di tornare al centro dell’attenzione, insieme a quella “grammatica” delle strutture dell’oggettività e della soggettività, che è costituita dalla Scienza della logica

 

Da ultimo vorremmo chiederle di nominare almeno cinque libri o contributi sulla filosofia classica tedesca che sono stati decisivi nella sua formazione.

Per rispondere a questa domanda, devo tornare indietro nel tempo. Vorrei ricordare quindi, in ordine rigorosamente alfabetico:

  • Claudio Cesa, Die Krise der Moralphilosophie, in Kant oder Hegel? (1983)
  • Franco Chiereghin, Dialettica dell’assoluto e ontologia della soggettività in Hegel (1980); Possibilità e limiti dell’agire umano (1990); Il problema della libertà in Kant (1991), ma anche, naturalmente, ciò che precede questi volumi, a partire da L’influenza dello spinozismo nella formazione della filosofia hegeliana (1961)
  • Dieter Henrich, Der ontologische Gottesbeweis (1960)
  • Giuliano Marini, Libertà soggettiva e libertà oggettiva nella “Filosofia del diritto” di Hegel (1978)
  • Adriaan Peperzak, Autoconoscenza dell’assoluto. Lineamenti della filosofia dello spirito hegeliana (1988)
  • Ludwig Siep, Anerkennung als Prinzip der praktischen Philosophie (1979)
  • Valerio Verra, Introduzione a Hegel (1988)

Si tratta di un elenco solo parziale e approssimativo. Dietro ciascuno dei testi citati, ci sono vari altri lavori che hanno condotto a quegli esiti, ma soprattutto, nella maggior parte dei casi, ci sono studiosi, che ho avuto il privilegio di conoscere di persona e che hanno contribuito in modo decisivo alla mia formazione.

 

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/hpd-holidays-hegelian-interviews-francesca-menegoni/

Convegno: “La fortuna di Hegel in Italia nell’Ottocento. Edizioni e studi” (Roma, 19-20 settembre 2019)

Siamo lieti di dare notizia del convegno La fortuna di Hegel in Italia nell’Ottocento. Edizioni e studi che si terrà presso l’Università degli Studi di Roma “La Sapienza” (Dipartimento di Filosofia, via Carlo Fea 2, 00161 Roma Aula 2) dal 19 al 20 settembre 2019.

Riportiamo di seguito il programma dell’evento.

***

Giovedì 19 settembre, ore 15,30:

Sezione 1. Prima l’Unità italiana

Presiede: Pierluigi Valenza (Università Sapienza Roma)

Federica Pitillo (Università Sapienza Roma – FSU Jena): Una rivoluzione silenziosa: storia e diritto nelle edizioni preunitarie di Hegel

Massimiliano Biscuso (Istituto Italiano Studi Filosofici Napoli): Ottavio Colecchi interprete dell’estetica hegeliana

Pausa (15 minuti)

Stefania Zanardi (Università degli studi di Genova): Hegel e Rosmini

Thomas S. Hoffmann (FernUniversität in Hagen): Le specificità della fortuna di Hegel in Italia nel contesto dell’hegelismo internazionale dell’Ottocento

 

Venerdì 20 settembre, ore 9,30:

Sezione 2. Dopo l’Unità italiana

Presiede: Marcello Mustè (Università Sapienza Roma)

Elena Nardelli (Università di Trieste): Le traduzioni di Alessandro Novelli (1863-64). Un’operazione “semplicemente scellerata”?

Stefania Achella (Università “G. d’Annunzio” Chieti-Pescara): Scienza e vita in Francesco De Sanctis

Pausa (15 minuti)

Alessandro Savorelli (Scuola Normale Superiore Pisa): Augusto Vera tra “ortodossia” e “destra” hegeliana

Claudio Tuozzolo (Università “G. d’Annunzio” Chieti-Pescara): Bertrando Spaventa: riformatore delle Prime categorie?

Marco Diamanti (Università Sapienza Roma – FU Hagen): «Dalla vita al pensiero». Antonio Labriola e l’eredità di Hegel

 

Info: marco.diamanti@uniroma1.it

 

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/convegno-la-fortuna-di-hegel-in-italia-nellottocento-edizioni-e-studi-roma-19-20-settembre-2019/

HPD – Holidays: L. Corti, L. Illetterati, G. Miolli: Introduzione al nuovo numero di «Giornale di metafisica» (Anno XI, 2/2018): “Meta-Filosofia”

hegelpd takes a summer holiday. In this period we publish some posts already appeared on the blog.

 

Siamo felici di condividere con i nostri lettori l’introduzione al nuovo numero di «Giornale di metafisica» (Anno XI, 2/2018)“Meta-filosofia”, scritta dai curatori del volume Luca CortiLuca Illetterati e Giovanna Miolli.

L’introduzione è scaricabile in pdf a questo link.

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/hpd-holidays-l-corti-l-illetterati-g-miolli-introduzione-al-nuovo-numero-di-giornale-di-metafisica-anno-xi-2-2018-meta-filosofia/

New Release: Michael Forster, Johannes Korngiebel, Klaus Vieweg (Eds.): “Idealismus und Romantik in Jena. Figuren und Konzepte zwischen 1794 und 1807” (Fink Verlag, 2018)

We are glad to give notice of the release of the book Idealismus und Romantik in Jena. Figuren und Konzepte zwischen 1794 und 1807, edited by Michael Forster, Johannes Korngiebel and Klaus Vieweg (Fink Verlag, 2018).

From the publisher’s website:

In Jena entstehen zwischen 1794 und 1807 zwei geistesgeschichtliche Strömungen von Weltgeltung: der Idealismus und die Romantik. Die rasante Entwicklung immer neuer Ideen ist durch eine beträchtliche Anzahl junger, kreativer Geister geprägt, die in fruchtbarem Austausch und gegenseitiger Kritik um ein neues, angemessenes Verständnis der Moderne ringen.
Im Fokus des Bandes stehen Fragen zu einzelnen Autoren genauso wie zum Verhältnis beider Strömungen zueinander.

For further information, please visit the Fink Verlag’s website.

New Release: Michael Forster, Johannes Korngiebel, Klaus Vieweg (Eds.): Idealismus und Romantik in Jena. Figuren und Konzepte zwischen 1794 und 1807 (Fink Verlag, 2018)

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/new-release-michael-forster-johannes-korngiebel-klaus-vieweg-eds-idealismus-und-romantik-in-jena-figuren-und-konzepte-zwischen-1794-und-1807-fink-verlag-2018/

CFP: Reconstructing Reason: Developing the concept of reason through history (University of Toronto, 15-16 November 2019)

We are glad to give notice of the forthcoming Annual University of Toronto Graduate Conference in Philosophy Reconstructing Reason: Developing the concept of reason through history. The conference will take place on 15th-16th November 2019 at the Department of Philosophy of the University of Toronto. The call for papers has been send out.

Submission deadline: September 6th, 2019. 

Below you can find the description of the conference, the list of the speakers and the text of the call from the website of the event.

***

The Department of Philosophy at the University of Toronto is pleased to announce the nineteenth annual Graduate Philosophy Conference, to be held November 15-16, 2019 in Toronto, Ontario. Our theme this year is ‘Reconstructing Reason: Developing the concept of reason through history’. The conference invites submissions from graduate students working in all areas in philosophy that relate to the conference’s main themes.

Keynote Speakers

Robert B. Brandom (University of Pittsburgh). Robert Brandom works in the philosophy of language, logic, German idealism, and neo-pragmatism. His theory of reasoning known as “inferentialism” has been widely influential both inside and outside the discipline and treats many of the leading issues in contemporary philosophy in a way that is both systematic and historically illuminating. Dr. Brandom’s most recent book, A Spirit of Trust, gives a new and provocative interpretation of the distinctively social and historical development of reason in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.

Susan Haack (University of Miami). Susan Haack is a leading figure in the philosophy of science, language, logic, and epistemology. Her work – deeply influenced by the American pragmatist tradition – encompasses both philosophical and legal concerns regarding the nature of evidence, belief, reasoning, and truth. Her books include Defending Science—Within Reason and Evidence Matters: Science, Proof, and Truth in the Law. Dr. Haack’s recent work documents the fascinating way social and historical circumstances influence the development of the meaning of scientific and legal concepts and shows how this tendency can inform our understanding of rationality.

Conference Description:

What is reason? Although the concept of ‘reason’ has been central to the practice and self-conception of philosophy throughout its history the way philosophers have understood this concept has changed dramatically over time. Ancient Greek philosophers like Plato and Aristotle, conceived reason as a metaphysical principle of the world. Early Moderns like Descartes and Kant viewed ‘reason’ as a faculty of the human mind. Today, many philosophers conceive reason – and its sibling, ‘science’ – as one instrument or method among others whose authority may wax and wane with changing circumstances. In this conference, we explore the history behind the development of the concept of reason and investigate the relevance of this history to contemporary philosophy.

We welcome submissions that address any questions related to our theme. Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Changing conceptions of reason through history.
  • The relationship between history and epistemology.
  • The relationship between pluralism and relativism.
  • The role of genealogy in historical explanations.
  • The role of social relations, recognition, and intersubjectivity in reasoning.
  • Our rational relationship to past and future generations.
  • Reason in the pragmatist tradition.
  • The Kantian and post-Kantian ideal of the unity of reason.
  • Style’s of reasoning in the history and philosophy of science.
  • Reason in the social sciences vs. reason in the natural sciences

We conceive of the conference’s theme very broadly and welcome submissions from all areas in philosophy that relate to the conference’s main themes.

Deadline for Submission: September 6th, 2019

Submissions: Please send submissions to torontophilgradconf@gmail.com. Submissions must be from graduate students, sent in PDF format, and prepared for blind review. Papers should not exceed 4000 words, and should include an abstract not exceeding 300 words. In your email, please include your name, paper title, and institutional affiliation. Only one submission per author. Limited travel stipends are available. Authors will be notified of decisions by September 22nd, 2019.

For further information regarding the call, please visit the website of the conference.

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/cfp-reconstructing-reason-developing-the-concept-of-reason-through-history-university-of-toronto-15-16-november-2019/

HPD – Digest (March – July 2019)

hpd-digest offers an overview of the most recent activities, events and relevant publications involving the members of hegelpd, the Research Group on Classical German Philosophy in Padova.
Its aim is to give news of the scientific activity carried out by the group and its single members, as well as of noteworthy events taking place in Padova, and the general research topics on which we are currently focusing.

 

HEGELIAN INTERVIEWS: We are happy to continue with the series Hegelian Interviews, started on the occasion of hegelpd’s fifth birthday. The last interview has been with Paul Redding. Professor Redding answers some questions about the path of his philosophical education, the contribution of the Australian philosophical community to studies in classical German philosophy, the contemporary relevance of Hegel’s metaphysics interpreted as a form of modal actualism, and the metaphilosophical fruitfulness of Hegel’s thought for the understanding of today’s societies.

 

2018/2019 RESEARCH SEMINAR: Hegel: from the objective to the absolute spirit has been the topic of this year’s seminar of the Doctoral School in Philosophy of the University of Padova. The last meetings have taken place: the ninth one with Armando Manchisi on Religion “Grundlage” of the State? Some Remarks about § 270 Anm. in Hegel’s Elements of the Philosophy of Rights, the tenth one with Sebastian Stein on The Self-Knowing Idea and Us. Hegel’s Non-Spiritualist Metaphilosophy, the eleventh one with Klaus Vieweg on Hegel in Wonderland – The Beginning of the Logic, and the twelfth one with Dean Moyar on The Proximity of Philosophy to Religion. Hegel’s Evaluative Reason.

 

NEW DAAD PROJECT: RETHINKING NATURE (2018-2020): The International research project Rethinking Nature (rethinkingnature.com) has been funded by the DAAD for two more years (2018-2020). The DAAD joint project between hegelpd and the Forschungszentrum für Klassische Deutsche Philosophie/Hegel-Archiv at the University of Bochum has the aim of investigating the notion of “nature” in Classical German Philosophy, putting it into dialogue with various current debates on naturalism.
Two Padova-Bochum DAAD workshops on Forms of Nature in Classical German Philosophy have taken place in 2019: the first one took place in Bochum on May 23rd-24th, the second one in Padova on July 4th-5th

 

WORKSHOPS: The workshop Nature Between Politics and Metaphysics: Reassessing German Idealism and Romanticism, organized by Luca Corti and Lorenzo Rustighi took place in Padova on June 24th and 25th. The event revolved around Alison Stone’s latest book Nature, Ethics and Gender in German Romanticism and Idealism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2018).

 

NEW RELEASES: We are glad to announce some new publications by members of the staff:

  • Die Idee als „sich wissende Wahrheit“, by Armando Manchisi, Hegel-Jahrbuch, eds. by A. Arndt, B. Bowman, M. Gerhard and J. Zovko, vol. 11, issue 1, 2018, pp. 87-92.
  • Hegel’s Theory of Truth as a Theory of Self-Knowledge, by Giovanna Miolli, Hegel-Jahrbuch, eds. by A. Arndt, B. Bowman, M. Gerhard and J. Zovko, vol. 11, issue 1, 2018, pp. 128-133.
  • Prolegomena für eine heterodoxe Lektüre von Hegels Anthropologie, by Luca Corti, Hegel-Jahrbuch, eds. by A. Arndt, B. Bowman, M. Gerhard and J. Zovko, vol. 11, issue 1, 2018, pp. 295-299.
  • Die Einteilung der Poesie. Bemerkungen zu K.W.F. Solgers Gattungspoetik, by Francesco Campana, in M. Forster, J. Korngiebel and K. Vieweg (eds. by), Idealismus und Romantik in Jena. Figuren und Konzepte zwischen 1794 und 1807, München, Wilhelm Fink, 2018, pp. 267-285.
  • the latest issue of the Giornale di Metafisica, XI, n. 2, 2018, devoted to the topic of Meta-Philosophy, edited by Luca Corti, Luca Illetterati and Giovanna Miolli.
  • the latest issue of Verifiche, XLII, n. 1-2, 2018.
  • La traduzione come lavoro filosofico, by Luca Illetterati, in N. Curcio (ed. by), Franco Volpi filosofo e amico, Vicenza, Ronzani, 2019, pp. 113-125.
  • L’origine e la sua traduzione (o della traduzione come origine), by Luca Illetterati, in G. Gurisatti and A. Gnoli (eds. by), Franco Volpi. Il pudore del pensiero, Brescia, Morcelliana, 2019, pp. 193-236.
  • Soggettività e violenza. Una prospettiva hegeliana, by Luca Illetterati, in C. Agnello, R. Caldarone, A. Cicatello and R.M. Lupo (eds. by), Il campo della metafisica. Studi in onore di Giuseppe Nicolaci, vol. 1, Palermo, Palermo University Press, 2018, pp. 259-281.
  • L’ambiguità della metafisica nel pensiero di Hegel, by Luca Illetterati and Elena Tripaldi, in E. Berti (ed. by), Storia della metafisica, Carocci, 2019, pp. 249-278.
  • Il normativo e il naturale. Saggi su Leibniz, by Antonio M. Nunziante, Padova University Press, 2019.

 

CARLA MILANI DAMIÃO VISITING PROFESSOR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PADOVA. From March to August 2019 Carla Milani Damião was visiting professor at the University of Padova. She is working on the project The Memory of Oneself and of the World: (Auto)Biographical and Historical Time in the Search for Representing the Truth in Goethe and Walter Benjamin.

 

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/hpd-digest-march-july-2019/

New Release: Jakub Mácha and Alexander Berg (eds.), “Wittgenstein and Hegel. Reevaluation of Difference” (De Gruyter, 2019)

We are glad to give notice of the release of the book Wittgenstein and Hegel. Reevaluation of Difference, edited by Jakub Mácha and Alexander Berg (De Gruyter, 2019).

From the publisher’s website:

This book brings together for the first time two philosophers from different traditions and different centuries. While Wittgenstein was a focal point of 20th century analytic philosophy, it was Hegel’s philosophy that brought the essential discourses of the 19th century together and developed into the continental tradition in 20th century. This now-outdated conflict took for granted Hegel’s and Wittgenstein’s opposing positions and is being replaced by a continuous progression and differentiation of several authors, schools, and philosophical traditions. The development is already evident in the tendency to identify a progression from a ‘Kantian’ to a ‘Hegelian phase’ of analytical philosophy as well as in the extension of right and left Hegelian approaches by modern and postmodern concepts. Assessing the difference between Wittgenstein and Hegel can outline intersections of contemporary thinking.

 

You can read here the Table of Contents of the volume.

For further information, please visit De Gruyter’s website.

 

New Release: Wittgenstein and Hegel. Reevaluation of Difference

Contents licensed by CC BY-NC-ND. Your are free to share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, under the following terms:

  • Attribution - You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial - You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • NoDerivatives - If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Article's url: http://www.hegelpd.it/hegel/new-release-wittgenstein-and-hegel-reevaluation-of-difference/